Biblical Greek at Concord Baptist Church

Learning the Basics of Biblical Greek for the Glory of Jesus Christ

Tuesday
08/26/2008

by glenn

Logos Bible Software Blog

I have some cool news to announce for those of you out there who use Libronix and Logos Bible software. Logos has launched a new software blog that offers excellent resources, tips, tools, and more. I encourage you to visit it here. I’ve also added it to our blogroll in the sidebar.

For those interested in getting some free software, read more about it here. All you have to do is add them to your blogroll and make a post about this page. Check it out!

Tuesday
08/26/2008

by glenn

Audio: Mark 4 and Romans 5

This past Sunday we had a really good class and finished up our translation of Mark 4:30-34. We also started looking at Romans 1:1-5 by discussing verse five and “the obedience of faith”, inparticular, along with Romans 1:17 and 3:22, regarding Paul’s use of the Greek Genitive. Enjoy!Β  πŸ™‚

Wednesday
08/20/2008

by glenn

Audio: Verbal Roots & Review

This past Sunday we read through the New Testament Greek verbal roots. We also found the time to do one more verse in Mark 4 (verse 33). We had some good discussion about Jesus’ use of the parables and why it is that he always used parables. See the following links to PDFs of the verbal roots and a blank practice sheet for you to test yourself on the verbal roots.

Verbal Roots Practice Sheet

Verbal Roots with Definitions (Answer Sheet)

Monday
08/18/2008

by glenn

Codex Sinaiticus

I’ve just added a new link to the blogroll in the sidebar. The link will take you to the newly released Codex Sinaiticus Project website. These new sites are the types of things that make the Internet “worth it” more and more these days. We are now able to have access to the world’s oldest complete copy of the Greek New Testament, for free, at our home computers. We can study it and read it and just enjoy the fact that God has providentially preserved such a manuscript for us to use in translating His word into the rest of the world’s languages. God be praised!

Here is some more information about the codex and the web site. Enjoy!

Codex Sinaiticus

Codex Sinaiticus is one of the most important books in the world. Handwritten well over 1600 years ago, the manuscript contains the Christian Bible in Greek, including the oldest complete copy of the New Testament. Its heavily corrected text is of outstanding importance for the history of the Bible and the manuscript – the oldest substantial book to survive Antiquity – is of supreme importance for the history of the book.

The Codex Sinaiticus Project

The Codex Sinaiticus Project is an international collaboration to reunite the entire manuscript in digital form and make it accessible to a global audience for the first time. Drawing on the expertise of leading scholars, conservators and curators, the Project gives everyone the opportunity to connect directly with this famous manuscript.

The Codex Sinaiticus Website

This is the first release of the Codex Sinaiticus Project website. This website will be substantially updated in November 2008 and in July 2009, by when the website will have been fully developed.

Monday
08/11/2008

by glenn

Audio: Mark 4:30-32

This week we decided to review what we have learned by translating one of the passages of Scripture that Pastor David preached on this past Sunday morning. It was really a fun time and we had some good discussions about the Greek text. Please pull out your UBS Reader’s Edition, if you have one, and follow along as we walk our way through the Greek text of the parable of the mustard seed in Mark 4:30-32.

Here is the New English Translation’s (NET Bible) rendering of the verses:

He also asked, β€œTo what can we compare the kingdom of God, or what parable can we use to present it? It is like a mustard seed that when sown in the ground, even though it is the smallest of all the seeds in the ground – when it is sown, it grows up, becomes the greatest of all garden plants, and grows large branches so that the wild birds can nest in its shade.”

I will try to remember to post my translation later this week. Enjoy! πŸ™‚

Tuesday
08/05/2008

by glenn

Mondays with Mounce

Hello Class! I’m excited to announce that Dr. Bill Mounce, the scholar who wrote our class textbook and workbook, has joined up with other scholars to do a daily weblog called Koinonia. And best of all, Bill is going a weekly article on Biblical Greek called “Mondays with Mounce.” The first week is up and it is a great post that really starts to deal with the reality of the Greek language and how it translates into our own language. Here is a link to that article. Below is a brief excerpt to entice you to read the whole thing:

“Does Greek help us make a decision? Well, only partially. Wouldn’t it be great if a knowledge of Greek made all the answers clear to us? It would make all the hours of learning the language seem more worthwhile. But as you will hear me say over and over again in this blog, grammar usually shows us the possible meanings, but it is context that determines which of the options is right for any particular passage.

True, by showing us the options, Greek grammar thereby limits possible meanings. There will be some possible meanings in English that simply lie outside the scope of what Greek allows. So in that sense grammar helps us interpret a passage. But for the most part grammar simply shows us the available options.”

I hope you will visit their blog each Monday and read his article as we continue to study New Testament Greek. It will be very helpful and it’s also going to help bring what we are studying in class down to a practical and very applicable level in how we understand Scripture in our own language.

Enjoy the reading and please let me know your questions or comments after you read his first article. πŸ™‚